Emerging Trends in Music

Emerging trends in music

Providing an authentic and exclusive music experience has always been vital for Blaise Bellville (Boiler Room) and the founders of the Red Bull Music Academy, Torsten Schmidt & Many Ameri. Thorsten and Blaise share their ideas on the power of music to provoke a cultural change and how to find these new talents who dare to do that. The session is kicked off by Rich Riley who gives us an overview of the state of Shazam.

Rich Riley, Shazam

In terms of music and demand for music, it’s never been better. The disruption is coming on the supply side. The ways people consume music is changing. There has been dramatic growth in streams rental and ad supported music. For us, all of those providers are partners. We think it’s an exciting time to be in the music field.

People are shazaming over 18million times per day. Shazam is the single highest rated app in the app store. It was founded 12 years ago. It took ten years to get the first billion shazams, now they get a billion shazams every 60 days.

A Shazam is a very powerful signal of intent.

With Shazam you can see how a song spreads. It starts in New York, and you can watch it spread across the country. You can also use Shazam for TV or for A&R. Shazam can predict the billboard charts a couple of weeks in advance.

Blaise Belville from Boiler Room and Thorsten Schmidt from Redbull Music Academy

Boiler Room is an online music show that showcases new music around the world. They live stream and record those events to a global audience. It started out as a project for a couple of friends in an actual boiler room and in 2011, they did their first cooperation with the Red Bull Music Academy.

The Red Bull Music academy is a tool to do awesome stuff. And they do that by finding emerging artists at early stages of their careers. Creating a model that allows you to speak to individual tastes is very valuable these days. In the pre-internet era new music tastes were controlled by a very small group of big voices. Post internet everyone's taste became much broader and the audience splintered into small groups or micro scenes that were difficult to be addressed by big media.

Boiler Room and Red Bull Music Academy are passionate about new music and people starting out. It’s become their model to speak to individual tastes and not reach for the mainstream.

If you are going to be there for artists like this, it needs to be for the long haul. And if you do it long enough it will eventually pay off. Last Years Kanye West album was produced by people under thirty who as far back as 6 years ago had been participants of the RBMA.

Record sales can no longer be a mark of quality music anymore.

It’s difficult to find models that are compatible of the idea of standing by the little guy in music. There is Bandcamp which works with many small artists, enough that they can help the artists while still covering their costs as opposed to working with fewer and hoping for the big payoff.

The old school way of the industry controlling the marketing of a few bands is over, now there is a lot more freedom of choice but cutting through the noise is much more difficult. RBMA and Boiler Room are trying to navigate that and regain the curatorial voice.

Mentioned in this live blog

Rich riley carr%c3%a9 web
Rich Riley
Shazam
CEO
Shazam
http://dld-conference.com/users/rich-riley
New York
http://s3.amazonaws.com/dldwebsite-production/black_and_white_avatars/rich-riley/large/Rich_Riley-carr%C3%A9-web.jpg
Blaise bellville quadrat
Blaise Bellville
Boiler Room
Founder / CEO
Boiler Room
http://dld-conference.com/users/blaise-bellville
New North Place
http://s3.amazonaws.com/dldwebsite-production/black_and_white_avatars/blaise-bellville/large/Blaise-Bellville_Quadrat.jpg

All DLDnyc 14 Blogposts